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  • Lunedì 13 Novembre 2006
  • Ore 16 - 18.40 - 21.20

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MAN'S CHEST

RegiaGore Verbinski
CastJack Sparrow - Johnny Depp Will Turner - Orlando Bloom Elizabeth Swann - Keira Knightley Bootstrap Bill - Stellan Skarsgard Davy Jones - Bill Nighy Norrington - Jack Davenport Gibbs - Kevin R. McNally Gov. Weatherby Swann - Jonathan Pryce Pintel - Lee Arenberg Ragetti - Mackenzie Crook Cutler Beckett - Tom Hollander Tia Dalma - Naomie Harris Captain Bellamy - Alex Norton Cotton - David Bailie Marty - Martin Klebba Mercer - David Schofield
GenereCommedia
Anno2006
NazioneUSA
DistribuzioneBUENA VISTA INTERNATIONAL ITALIA
Durata151'
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MAN'S CHEST
 
Screenplay, Ted Elliott, Terry Rossio
Based on characters created by Elliott, Rossio, Stuart Beattie, Jay Wolpert, and on Walt Disney's "Pirates of the Caribbean."

  • La Storia
    Charming rogue pirate Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) is back for a grand, swashbuckling, nonstop joyride filled with devilish pirate humor, monstrous sea creatures and breathtaking black magic. Now, Jack's got a blood debt to pay – he owes his soul to the legendary Davy Jones, ghostly Ruler of the Ocean Depths…but ever-crafty Jack isn't about to go down without a fight. Along the way, dashing Will Turner (Orlando Bloom) and the beautiful Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) get caught up in the thrilling whirlpool of misadventures stirred up in Jack's quest to avoid eternal damnation by seizing the fabled Dead Man’s Chest!
  • La Critica
    Disneyland's "Pirates of the Caribbean" ride may have been improved, but the film franchise has been downgraded with this first of two sequels to the 2003 popcorn smash. As with the two "Matrix" follow-ups, which were shot back-to-back like the second and third "Pirates" entries, there is a sense of bloat and where-do-we-go-from here aimlessness to this unconscionably protracted undertaking. As with the "Matrix" pictures, however, public anticipation is such that nothing can stop "Dead Man's Chest" from filling up with B.O. gold; pic is like a slot machine that gobbles up the public's money while giving little back, and, somehow, people don't mind.
    Even judged strictly as a commercial product, this new effort seems misguided. Producer Jerry Bruckheimer made sure the key players -- Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley, as well as director Gore Verbinski and much of the crew -- reboarded for the continued voyage, and no expense has been spared in order to make the effects even more spectacular this time around.
    But why wear out the film's welcome with a wearisome two-and-a-half-hour running time when a tight-ship 100 minutes would have insured more constant excitement, not to mention giving exhibitors more showtimes per day?
    The first "Pirates," innocuousness and all, became a 4 million-grossing worldwide phenomenon by virtue of a shrewd blend of old-fashioned storytelling tropes and modern push-button thrill-ride construction. But primary viewer affection stemmed from Depp's utterly eccentric rendition of a drunken sailor as an inadvertent hero; pic mainstreamed the actor's appeal to an unprecedented extent while allowing him to keep his cool.
    Inevitably, the effect of his wild makeup and costume, mincing manner and carefully calculated unpredictability proves less arresting the second time around. The surprise is gone, but so is the nearly faultless comic timing, not to mention any good lines.
    Depp may have been taking risky shots in the dark in creating Jack Sparrow three years ago, but they all felicitously found their mark. This time, the characterization's haphazard nature becomes transparent; even his best moments trigger only giggles, and the fumbling takes what wind there is out of the picture's sails.
    Scenario by the returning team of Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio consists of too many over-elaborated searches by various parties for three items: a not entirely reliable compass, a treasure chest and the key that will open it.
    Among those involved in the multiple pursuits is Will Turner (Bloom), imprisoned with his bride-to-be Elizabeth Swann (Knightley) by nefarious East India Trading Co. rep Lord Beckett (Tom Hollander) and forced to track down Captain Sparrow, who sets sail on the Black Pearl in an attempt to wrest control of the chest from Davy Jones (Bill Nighy), captain of an undead pirate crew capable of considerable nautical mayhem.
    Dramatic line consists entirely of connecting the dots between extravagant and aspirationally comic action scenes, which prominently include an escape from cannibals by several men who jointly move in a large viney ball; a three-way sword fight choreographed across an entire island and partly conducted as men peddle the slats of a vast mill wheel as it rolls hither and yon (a gag Buster Keaton would have enjoyed -- and done better), and multiple attacks by a ferocious giant octopus whose grotesque beaky mouth, when finally seen in close-up, is the stuff of Freudian male nightmares.
    Still, the f/x highlight is undoubtedly the mossy gang -- Davy Jones' misshapen sailors doomed to a purgatory of servitude on board the Flying Dutchman, a mildewy craft of astonishing speed that functions like a submarine above and beneath the waves. As in a clever cartoon, these barnacled men are each distinctively conceived, from the mate who resembles a Hammerhead shark to the bloke whose head remains half-hidden within a shell. Best of all is Davy himself, whose remarkable visage is festooned with a beard of moving octopus tentacles and whose strength as a singular villain is heightened by Nighy's wily performance.
    But the problem with the "Pirates" films, and with this one more than the first, is that there's not a genuine moment in them -- no point of human contact (except, perhaps, for the Herculean efforts of Stellan Skarsgard, behind heavy makeup, to provide hints of a tragic dimension as Will's doomed father); they're baldly concocted, confected, engineered.
    "Dead Man's Chest" puts the viewer into a bland stupor, willing to be entertained, and maybe audiences will be, up to a point, by the beautiful actors, sumptuous production values and the stray desires the film may stimulate to go to Disneyland or Las Vegas. These are the odd films that succeed by stirring neither the emotions nor the mind.
    Todd McCarthy, Variety.com
  • Il Regista
    Gore Verbinski, one of American cinema's most inventive directors who was a punk-rock guitarist as a teenager and had to sell his guitar to buy his first camera, is now the director of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (2006) which made the industry record for highest opening weekend of all time (5,600,000) and grossed over billion dollars worldwide.

    He was born Gregor Verbinski on March 16, 1964, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, United States. His father was of Polish descent, he worked as a nuclear physicist at the Oak Ridge Lab. In 1967 the Verbinski family moved to California, and young Gregor grew up near San Diego. His biggest influences as a kid were Franz Kafka's Metamorphosis and Black Sabbath's Master of Reality. He started his professional career as a guitarist for punk-rock bands, such as The Daredevils and The Little Kings, and also made his first films together with friends. After having developed a passion for filmmaking, he sold his guitar to buy a Super-8mm camera. Then Verbinski attended the prestigious UCLA Film School, from which he graduated in 1987 with his BFA in Film. His first professional directing jobs were music videos for alternative bands, such as L7, Bad Religion, and Monster Magnet. Then he moved to advertising and directed commercials for Nike, Canon, Skittles, United airlines and Coca-Cola. In 1993 he created the renowned Budweiser advertising campaign featuring croaking frogs, for which he was awarded the advertising Silver Lion at Cannes and also received four Clio Awards.

    Verbinski made his feature directorial debut with Mousehunt (1997), a remarkably visual cartoonish family comedy. His next effort, The Mexican (2001), came to a modest result. However, Verbinski bounced back with a hit thriller The Ring (2002), grossing over 0 million dollars worldwide. His biggest directorial success came with the Disney theme park ride based Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003), with a brilliant acting ensemble, grossing over 0 million dollars, and bringing five Oscar nominations and many other awards and nominations. Disney ordered two more films which Verbinski shot one after another on location in the Carribean islands, for which he had to endure both tetanus and typhoid immunization shots. After having survived several hurricanes, dealing with sick and injured actors, and troubleshooting after numerous technical difficulties of the epic-scale project, Verbinski delivered. He employed the same stellar cast in the sequel Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (2006) and the third installment of the 'Pirates' franchise Pirates of the Caribbean: At Worlds End (2007).

    Gore Verbinski does not like publicity. He has been enjoying a happy family life with his wife and his two sons. He is currently residing with his family in Los Angeles, California.


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